The Result
In this project my mission was to help a start-up move forward in the very first stages of its growth. Beside the initial onboarding mission, we reconsidered the identity of the app and created a design and structure that can still be kept when the app will grow over time.

As a UX/UI designer, I familiarise the client with design thinking, explaining the iterative way of working and explaining them methodologies of user research, so that they can incorporate this in their regular way of working.
Step 1: benchmarking
Kwel told me that - other than regular delivery services such as DHL, UPS and the French Colissimo - they offered a complete, customised service: including packaging of large and fragile goods and customs management.

Kwel wanted their new users to understand that their service may cost more than a regular delivery service at a first glace, but that they save their clients a lot of time and help their market grow. Kwel therefore should more feel like a delivery partner than a distant, bureaucratic multinational.
Step 2: field research, user interviews
Although the concept has worldwide potential, Kwel started launching their solution on the Parisian market. Their current clients were mostly sellers of design and crafts objects, new or second hand. To get a better understanding of the context of these merchants, I did field research in design shops in Paris and at the flea market of Saint Ouen (just outside of Paris).
I took interviews that I mostly had to start in an informal way, but it was very valuable seeing them in their working context. It made me realise, for example, that merchants typically spend little time on a computer and are sometimes not very app-oriented, prioritising traditional delivery solutions.
Step 3: creating a user archetype profile (persona)
Back from my field research I compiled my observations on the daily context of the merchant and their attitude towards delivery services in general, and towards a new app like Kwel in particular.

This compilation allowed me to create a so called ‘persona’, a fictional profile of the user archetype, which for this project was Hugues - see the ‘card’ below. In UX research this tool used to keep the typical user in mind throughout the process: whether we’re ideating, designing buttons or writing labels on the interface, we can always have a look at Hugues to remind ourselves of what would fit him best.
The persona for this project: Hugues, a Parisian design merchant
Step 4: user testing & iterations
User testing on both the newly created screens and the already existing flow allowed me to better integrate the two of them.

It also showed that the initial homepage was lacking structure. It became clear that the delivery request had to be more present as the main flow, and the additional services could be presented on a lower level.
lo-fi
paper concept
mid-fi
before testing
mid-fi
after testing
Step 5: user interface design
Although the audience of Kwel can be considered niche, they did not want to exclude any potential clients from other sectors. In their identity they wanted to remain a logistics company. Using mid-blue for trust and orange as a reference to transport, I tried to create a functional yet esthetical look and feel for the identity of the app.
Active
Inactive
Alternative button
Free form
Checkbox
Checked box
Drop down
Radio button
Checked radio
Most of the screens were forms: both the onboarding and the request for a delivery service demand the user to provide information. Form screens seem simple but there actually is a lot of challenge in making them as easy and nice to use as possible. This is particularly important when the forms are relatively long, as was the case for Kwel.
As the archetype user (think Hugues! ;)) is not necessarily tech savvy, I created the screens for low resolution phones. Kwel actually told me that they got negative user feedback on forms that were impossible to fill in on an older phone, blocking the entire process.
The screens of different flows had to be harmonised, so I created designs for the 3 flows of the app:
• Home + service information
• Onboarding
• Delivery price calculation
All the screen designs for this project in my Sketch file
The Mission
The Client:
Kwel is a Paris based start-up that enables sellers to send out large or fragile objects to their clients. It’s a B2B2C solution: they sell their service to merchants, so their final clients - the voyagers - can pay for it.
My mission was to:
Create an onboarding feature on their recently launched app and make their home screen understand new users what services Kwel offers.
The onboarding itself implied the relatively simple creation of a form through which users could register, but we also wanted users to get to know how Kwel works. And so we decided to
a) make new users understand Kwel’s services, even if they have never heard of them before
b)
give unregistered users access to the request flow, just like you would on any delivery service website, so the user can see how Kwel works.
“What do you do when you’re traveling and see a big, beautiful object that you want to take home?”
March 2020 - 2 weeks
Kwel
RESTRUCTURING A MOBILE B2B APP
UX strategy - user research  - UI design
Website, design, content & illustrations © Julia Fortuin - all rights reserved
Get in Touch
The Result
In this project my mission was to help a start-up move forward in the very first stages of its growth. Beside the initial onboarding mission, we reconsidered the identity of the app and created a design and structure that can still be kept when the app will grow over time.

As a UX/UI designer, I familiarise the client with design thinking, explaining the iterative way of working and explaining them methodologies of user research, so that they can incorporate this in their regular way of working.
Step 1: benchmarking
Kwel told me that - other than regular delivery services such as DHL, UPS and the French Colissimo - they offered a complete, customised service: including packaging of large and fragile goods and customs management.

Kwel wanted their new users to understand that their service may cost more than a regular delivery service at a first glace, but that they save their clients a lot of time and help their market grow. Kwel therefore should more feel like a delivery partner than a distant, bureaucratic multinational.
Step 2: field research, user interviews
Although the concept has worldwide potential, Kwel started launching their solution on the Parisian market. Their current clients were mostly sellers of design and crafts objects, new or second hand. To get a better understanding of the context of these merchants, I did field research in design shops in Paris and at the flea market of Saint Ouen (just outside of Paris).
I took interviews that I mostly had to start in an informal way, but it was very valuable seeing them in their working context. It made me realise, for example, that merchants typically spend little time on a computer and are sometimes not very app-oriented, prioritising traditional delivery solutions.
Step 3: creating a user archetype profile (persona)
Back from my field research I compiled my observations on the daily context of the merchant and their attitude towards delivery services in general, and towards a new app like Kwel in particular.

This compilation allowed me to create a so called ‘persona’, a fictional profile of the user archetype, which for this project was Hugues - see the ‘card’ below. In UX research this tool used to keep the typical user in mind throughout the process: whether we’re ideating, designing buttons or writing labels on the interface, we can always have a look at Hugues to remind ourselves of what would fit him best.
Step 4: user testing & iterations
User testing on both the newly created screens and the already existing flow allowed me to better integrate the two of them.

It also showed that the initial homepage was lacking structure. It became clear that the delivery request had to be more present as the main flow, and the additional services could be presented on a lower level.
lo-fi
paper concept
mid-fi
before testing
mid-fi
after testing
Step 5: user interface design
Although the audience of Kwel can be considered niche, they did not want to exclude any potential clients from other sectors. In their identity they wanted to remain a logistics company. Using mid-blue for trust and orange as a reference to transport, I tried to create a functional yet esthetical look and feel for the identity of the app.
Most of the screens were forms: both the onboarding and the request for a delivery service demand the user to provide information. Form screens seem simple but there actually is a lot of challenge in making them as easy and nice to use as possible. This is particularly important when the forms are relatively long, as was the case for Kwel.
As the archetype user (think Hugues! ;)) is not necessarily tech savvy, I created the screens for low resolution phones. Kwel actually told me that they got negative user feedback on forms that were impossible to fill in on an older phone, blocking the entire process.
The screens of different flows had to be harmonised, so I created designs for the 3 flows of the app:
• Home + service information
• Onboarding
• Delivery price calculation
The Mission
The Client:
Kwel is a Paris based start-up that enables sellers to send out large or fragile objects to their clients. It’s a B2B2C solution: they sell their service to merchants, so their final clients - the voyagers - can pay for it.
My mission was to:
Create an onboarding feature on their recently launched app and make their home screen understand new users what services Kwel offers.
The onboarding itself implied the relatively simple creation of a form through which users could register, but we also wanted users to get to know how Kwel works. And so we decided to
a) make new users understand Kwel’s services, even if they have never heard of them before
b)
give unregistered users access to the request flow, just like you would on any delivery service website, so the user can see how Kwel works.
“What do you do when you’re traveling and see a big, beautiful object that you want to take home?”
March 2020
2 weeks
Kwel
RESTRUCTURING A MOBILE B2B APP
UX strategy - user research UI design
Website, design, content & illustrations
© Julia Fortuin - all rights reserved
Julia Fortuin