When I finished my mission at Editions Didier the platform was ready to launch and being used on trial in language schools in France, Mexico and Thailand. With such a broad audience it was a challenge to offer a product that fits all. As became clear from tests in the classroom but also by being in touch with language schools, even more customization was a big demand. Schools (and ideally teachers) were interested in customizing e-learning courses just as they would pick and select exercises from a paper school book. A finalized product, but a story to be continued…
The Result
Step 1: collecting information & conceptualization
The content
Editions Didier had a big stock of high quality content for online learning: interactive exercises in SCORM format. These were often produced as a complimentary element to paper learning methods. Many were available on a Moodle, but Didier wanted to offer a more user-friendly interface that allowed course sequences instead of individual exercises. Moreover, Didier wanted to create new content, such as a vocabulary module and preparations for standardized exams (DELF and DALF).


What I did:

1. Provide a clear score that is easier to interpret.
2. Make it more evident that the app is not a shopping app.
3. Be more explicit about the statistics.
An exercise in SCORM format on the platform
The users and their needs
Didier Nomade was sold to language schools and aimed to reach 3 types of users:
1. Students
2. Teachers
3. Language school administrators

Didier wanted to create a customized access for each of the three profiles. They already had been in touch a lot with administrators and teachers about their needs. I continued research by making a task/user analysis: a diagram that lays out the key needs and tasks for each profile, which was the basis for the development of each of the account types.
A part of the user-task matrix for different user profiles

The platform’s functionality and features
Didier Nomade was built on an e-learning platform that was originally designed for use in an office setting. This meant that we had to customize it so it could meet the needs for language teaching, such as the following:
1. A detailed reporting for students and teachers with a 0 to 10 scale
2. Add a possibility for teachers and students to interact, via messaging and audio
3. Hide all features that were developed for an office setting.
I made an inventory of the platform and based on the task/user analysis we could decide wich features we could keep, had to hide, or needed to develop.
A sketch for the customization for the homepage, after connecting to the platform
Step 2: creating a Minimal Viable Product, user testing
During the first 3 months we created a minimal viable product. It included previously existing content that had been adapted to a new interface, plus a newly created course for teaching vocabulary that included artificial intelligence.

To see if it actually worked, I went to see French classes in practice, giving teachers and students access to Nomade. It made me realize that the platform was used by different teachers quite differently. Teachers often do not follow one method but improvise and collect teaching material as it suits them. Didier Nomade seemed valuable to them but in the same time it made us aware that customization was an important need.

Moreover, the tests gave practical feedback on how to improve the interface: provide ever more explicit wording
and give students clear incentives to motivate them.
Screen shot of a vocabulary course that was tested in schools
Step 3: feature development, usability testing
After the first tests, we developed new features in order of urgency. During the process, we were regularly in touch with language schools to get feedback. Before launching the product on the market, we organised a usability test in an external lab. Two usability experts tested the platform on 5 teachers and 5 students during two days. I provided information on the main tasks, the user profile to recruit.

It gave us information on how to further improve, but overall confirmed the platform was ready for its launch.
Snapshots from a course, including various new features
The Mission
The Client/Employer
Editions Didier, a renown editor of school books (member of the Hachette group), wanted to launch their first digital-first product: an e-learning platform to enhance teaching French as a foreign language (FLE) to adult learners, called Didier Nomade.
Didier Nomade was to be sold at language schools around the world, mostly Alliances Françaises and universities. I jumped on the project when the goal of the product had been defined and Didier chose an e-learning tool that would be the basis of this new platform. They recruted me first as a freelancer, and as the demand of work evolved I joined the team on a project basis.
As the product manager I was responsible for the following mission:
Customize an e-learning platform into a tool that meets all the specific needs for standardised language teaching
Internally, I was responsible for the coordination of functional needs of our editorial team and I mostly acted in a consultant/supporting role when it came to content creation for the platform.

Externally, I was the first contact for our contractors, giving briefings and feedback to an e-learning company and a graphical agency.
“How can we help adults in learning French more efficiently outside their classroom?”
2017-2019
Editions Didier
LAUNCH OF AN E-LEARNING PLATFORM
Product management - UX research - prototyping
Get in Touch
Website, design, content & illustrations © Julia Fortuin - all rights reserved
The Result
When I finished my mission at Editions Didier the platform was ready to launch and being used on trial in language schools in France, Mexico and Thailand. With such a broad audience it was a challenge to offer a product that fits all. As became clear from tests in the classroom but also by being in touch with language schools, even more customization was a big demand. Schools (and ideally teachers) were interested in customizing e-learning courses just as they would pick and select exercises from a paper school book. A finalized product, but a story to be continued…
Step 1: collecting information & conceptualization
The content
Editions Didier had a big stock of high quality content for online learning: interactive exercises in SCORM format. These were often produced as a complimentary element to paper learning methods. Many were available on a Moodle, but Didier wanted to offer a more user-friendly interface that allowed course sequences instead of individual exercises. Moreover, Didier wanted to create new content, such as a vocabulary module and preparations for standardized exams (DELF and DALF).
What I did:

1. Provide a clear score that is easier to interpret.
2. Make it more evident that the app is not a shopping app.
3. Be more explicit about the statistics.
An exercise in SCORM format on the platform

The users and their needs
Didier Nomade was sold to language schools and aimed to reach 3 types of users:
1. Students
2. Teachers
3. Language school administrators

Didier wanted to create a customized access for each of the three profiles. They already had been in touch a lot with administrators and teachers about their needs. I continued research by making a task/user analysis: a diagram that lays out the key needs and tasks for each profile, which was the basis for the development of each of the account types.
A part of the user-task matrix for different user profiles

The platform’s functionality and features
Didier Nomade was built on an e-learning platform that was originally designed for use in an office setting. This meant that we had to customize it so it could meet the needs for language teaching, such as the following:

- A detailed reporting for students and teachers with a 0 to 10 scale
- Add a possibility for teachers and students to interact, via messaging and audio
- Hide all features that were developed for an office setting.

I made an inventory of the platform and based on the task/user analysis we could decide wich features we could keep, had to hide, or needed to develop.
A sketch for the customization for the homepage, after connecting to the platform
Step 2: creating a Minimal Viable Product, user testing
During the first 3 months we created a minimal viable product. It included previously existing content that had been adapted to a new interface, plus a newly created course for teaching vocabulary that included artificial intelligence.

To see if it actually worked, I went to see French classes in practice, giving teachers and students access to Nomade. It made me realize that the platform was used by different teachers quite differently. Teachers often do not follow one method but improvise and collect teaching material as it suits them. Didier Nomade seemed valuable to them but in the same time it made us aware that customization was an important need.

Moreover, the tests gave practical feedback on how to improve the interface: provide ever more explicit wording
and give students clear incentives to motivate them.
Screen shot of a vocabulary course that was tested in schools
Step 3: feature development, usability testing
After the first tests, we developed new features in order of urgency. During the process, we were regularly in touch with language schools to get feedback. Before launching the product on the market, we organised a usability test in an external lab. Two usability experts tested the platform on 5 teachers and 5 students during two days. I provided information on the main tasks, the user profile to recruit.

It gave us information on how to further improve, but overall confirmed the platform was ready for its launch.
Snapshots from a course, including various new features
The Mission
The Client/Employer
Editions Didier, a renown editor of school books (member of the Hachette group), wanted to launch their first digital-first product: an e-learning platform to enhance teaching French as a foreign language (FLE) to adult learners, called Didier Nomade.
Didier Nomade was to be sold at language schools around the world, mostly Alliances Françaises and universities. I jumped on the project when the goal of the product had been defined and Didier chose an e-learning tool that would be the basis of this new platform. They recruted me first as a freelancer, and as the demand of work evolved I joined the team on a project basis.
As the product manager I was responsible for the following mission:
Customize an e-learning platform into a tool that meets all the specific needs for standardised language teaching
Internally, I was responsible for the coordination of functional needs of our editorial team and I mostly acted in a consultant/supporting role when it came to content creation for the platform.

Externally, I was the first contact for our contractors, giving briefings and feedback to an e-learning company and a graphical agency.
Editions Didier
LAUNCH OF AN E-LEARNING PLATFORM
Product management - UX research prototyping
“How can we help adults in learning French more efficiently outside their classroom?”
2017-2019
Website, design, content & illustrations
© Julia Fortuin - all rights reserved
Julia Fortuin