The Result
With the defined style and user test iterations, I built a functional prototype that can be developed straight away. With the proven interest and even necessity for out future, I am on the lookout for opportunities to make this app happen.
Step 1: problem definition (user surveys & interviews)
Ecology is such a vast subject that it is hard to choose just one angle for creating an application. When I started our qualitative and quantitative research for the project, it became clear that the interest for the subject exploding:  questionnaire lead to over 600 responses during a weekend. I came to understand that more flexible opening hours and more availability of eco-friendly products were the most common painpoints. But as this was difficult to influence through an app, we decided to go for the biggest solution withing reach: nearly 40% of the respondents mentioned that better information would help them making better choices.

For practical matters, I decided to focus on nutrition and for the moment leave aside anything that is non-food (energy, transport, clothing).
Step 2: conceptualization (user flow & information structure)
The example of Yuka set a clear structure for our eco-scan app, that we for now will call ‘Ecoviva’: a user scans a product, reads about the ecological impact of the scanned product, decides to include it (or not) in their statistics. A ‘basket’ page provides an overview of the ecological impact of a shopping spree, before validating it into the user’s overall tracking. In a scheme, it looks like this:
Flow chart showing the user journey of the app
Then the next question, what information to show about the ecological impact?  

The user inverviews and questionnaires gave a good idea of the information that users would like to see. After an iteration (a usability test discussed later in this article),  the following variables seemed to cover the users’ need:
The scores/criteria that the app will display for each product
Step 3: prototyping & iteration (wireframing & usability testing)
With our user flow, we first quickly drew a lo-fi prototype that we used for a usability test with five users.
The first lo-fi paper prototype that was tested on users
Although many elements could not yet be taken into consideration at this point (use of color, content, etc), the test clearly pointed out the following improvements:
1. Provide a clear score that is easier to interpret.
2. Make it more evident that the app is not a shopping app.
3. Be more explicit about the statistics.
I did these iterations on a mid-fi (digital) prototype before testing them again and finalizing the screens with the design.
Step 4: visual language and interface design
I wanted the interface to convey transparency and confidence in a better future. Ecology can be a frightning problem and I did not want users to feel confronted with guilt or consumerism. If anything it should be a practical tool that in the same time could make them feel a little better.

I therefore chose bright colors and created illustrations inspired by nature, using transparent effects. The visual languge is summarized in this style tile:
Style tile for the design of the screens
Translated into screens, I also used colours for the product card to indicate the outcome in a more immediate way: green for good products, red for the worst, and yellow & orange for everything in between.
The product card screens: the background color depends on the score
The Mission
If there is one topic that marks our time, quite unarguably it is the human impact on climate change. Between choosing local, organic, vegetarian or fair trade products, it’s hard to understand the impact of our daily choices. So what if there was an app that would tell us exactly that: the ecological impact of individual products?
We can already get a better understanding of the ingrediënts of our products through apps as Yuka, and several NGO’s have already launched their apps that enable calculating your ecological footprint by filling out your daily habits. In France there is the We Act For Good app by the WWF and the somewhat similar 90 Jours and Eco Life Hacks. However, they do not provide information on individual products in the way Yuka does.
So the goal of this mission was:
Create an app that allows consumers to discover the economic impact of a product at a glance.
This is an entirely self-run project that lead to a fully functional prototype.
“How can we understand the ecological impact of the products that we buy on a daily basis?”
February 2020
Ecoviva
CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT OF A MOBILE APP
Design thinking
UX research  - UI design
Website, design, content & illustrations
© Julia Fortuin - all rights reserved
Julia Fortuin
With the defined style and user test iterations, I built a functional prototype that can be developed straight away. With the proven interest and even necessity for out future, I am on the lookout for opportunities to make this app happen.
The Result
Step 1: problem definition (user surveys & interviews)
Ecology is such a vast subject that it is hard to choose just one angle for creating an application. When I started our qualitative and quantitative research for the project, it became clear that the interest for the subject exploding:  questionnaire lead to over 600 responses during a weekend. I came to understand that more flexible opening hours and more availability of eco-friendly products were the most common painpoints. But as this was difficult to influence through an app, we decided to go for the biggest solution withing reach: nearly 40% of the respondents mentioned that better information would help them making better choices.

For practical matters, I decided to focus on nutrition and for the moment leave aside anything that is non-food (energy, transport, clothing).
Step 2: conceptualization (user flow & information structure)
The example of Yuka set a clear structure for our eco-scan app, that we for now will call ‘Ecoviva’: a user scans a product, reads about the ecological impact of the scanned product, decides to include it (or not) in their statistics. A ‘basket’ page provides an overview of the ecological impact of a shopping spree, before validating it into the user’s overall tracking. In a scheme, it looks like this:
Flow chart showing the user journey of the app
Then the next question, what information to show about the ecological impact?

The user inverviews and questionnaires gave a good idea of the information that users would like to see. After an iteration (a usability test discussed later in this article),  the following variables seemed to cover the users’ need:
The scores/criteria that the app will display for each product
Step 3: prototyping & iteration (wireframing & usability testing)
With our user flow, we first quickly drew a lo-fi prototype that we used for a usability test with five users.
The first lo-fi paper prototype that was tested on users
Although many elements could not yet be taken into consideration at this point (use of color, content, etc), the test clearly pointed out the following improvements:
1. Provide a clear score that is easier to interpret.
2. Make it more evident that the app is not a shopping app.
3. Be more explicit about the statistics.
I did these iterations on a mid-fi (digital) prototype before testing them again and finalizing the screens with the design.
Step 4: visual language and interface design
I wanted the interface to convey transparency and confidence in a better future. Ecology can be a frightning problem and I did not want users to feel confronted with guilt or consumerism. If anything it should be a practical tool that in the same time could make them feel a little better.

I therefore chose bright colors and created illustrations inspired by nature, using transparent effects. The visual languge is summarized in this style tile:
Style tile for the design of the screens
Translated into screens, I also used colours for the product card to indicate the outcome in a more immediate way: green for good products, red for the worst, and yellow & orange for everything in between.
The product card screens: the background color depends on the score
The Mission
If there is one topic that marks our time, quite unarguably it is the human impact on climate change. Between choosing local, organic, vegetarian or fair trade products, it’s hard to understand the impact of our daily choices. So what if there was an app that would tell us exactly that: the ecological impact of individual products?
We can already get a better understanding of the ingrediënts of our products through apps as Yuka, and several NGO’s have already launched their apps that enable calculating your ecological footprint by filling out your daily habits. In France there is the We Act For Good app by the WWF and the somewhat similar 90 Jours and Eco Life Hacks. However, they do not provide information on individual products in the way Yuka does.
So the goal of this mission was:
Create an app that allows consumers to discover the economic impact of a product at a glance.
This is an entirely self-run project that lead to a fully functional prototype.
Ecoviva
CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT OF A MOBILE APP
Design thinking - UX research  - UI design
“How can we understand the ecological impact of the products that we buy on a daily basis?”
February 2020 - 2 weeks
Website, design, content & illustrations © Julia Fortuin - all rights reserved
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